Our latest special issues

 

pages-de-hsmilitaires2016gb-2The French Navy is being deployed on an increasing number of missions, including fight against terrorist armed forces and groups, drug and human trafficking, assistance to migrants. Amid the political uncertainties with the upcoming Presidential elections in 2017, sailors have openly expressed their concerns about future budgetary decisions. Manufacturers have stressed the sector’s contribution in French exportations, as evidenced by DCNS’s success in Australia with the Shortfin Barracuda. The interests of both parties converge: a high level of equipment fully supports the increasing number of missions, it is also the guarantor of the prestige of one the world’s leading Navies. From DCNS to Safran via Kership or Ixblue, the review drawn up in this special issue of Le Marin shows the French achievements and analyses the emerging issues amid an increasingly complex geopolitical environment.

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pages-de-hs_offshoregb2016For two years now, the oil and oil services sector has been adapting to the crisis affecting the industry and the lowered prices it has engendered. Whilst waiting for the hypothetical recovery of these prices, the offshore sector has learnt how to tighten its belt. In the process, savvy industry players in France in particular have demonstrated their ability to work miracles. Whether it be Subsea 7’s innovations in the pipeline sector, pipe specialist Vallourec’s tubular solutions, or Technip’s innovative contributions to offshore infrastructure installation, French businesses have time and again shown their impressive capacity for cost reduction in their respective domains. It is widely agreed that French industry players have displayed exceptional adaptability, particularly in their move towards RME and maximum diversification. And although – judging by the recent disappointing concessions sales in the USA – the general climate is looking rather grim, these past two years in crisis may also force the offshore industry to increase its R&D efforts in order to push production and exploitation innovation to the next level.

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The unfailing yacht crayachts_une_2016ze. This comes as good news for Europe, and for three countries especially (Germany, the Netherlands and Italy), who are retaining the leadership in the global shipbuilding industry. The battle for ship size is raging. The world’s largest yacht (with a gross tonnage of almost 16,000) was delivered by German yard Lürssen this year. Meanwhile, owners have started to buy more expensive tenders and yacht toys, which are gradually replacing the conventional jet-skis.
Where does France stand? While a yard like Monte Carlo Yachts (based in Italy but owned by the Bénéteau group) is successfully selling motor yachts – whose latest MYC 80 was launched in July – others such as Couach, CNB, JFA, Ocea or Grand Large Yachting are keeping to less spectacular vessels (exploration yachts, sailing yachts), in line with the current market trend focused on upgrading.

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service_vessels_2016_coverThey are used for fishing, cruising, ferrying teams that will install the future offshore wind farms, or towing the container ships that bring the manufactured goods that we use daily to our ports. Some of these ships are well known – those that are used as tour boats on the Seine, for example -, others are not.
In this special issue, readers will learn about these kingpins of the maritime economy and the background of a continuously changing sector. Technological innovation, design, engines, onboard electronics, development of the fishing industry, etc. The magazine presents a close-up of the challenges of the maritime sectors, reports on innovations in French shipyards and on the projects in progress across France.

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military_ships_2015_coverThe French Navy, as recent events continue to show, is increasingly in demand. The deployment of the Charles de Gaulle aircraft-carrier off the Syrian coast to fight ISIS is proof of this, though this time in a much darker context. This is yet another mission which will spark comments that the Navy is working miracles despite its stretched resources. And this is not the only unknown.
As this special issue of Le Marin was being published, there were lingering uncertainties about the future of Minister of Defence Jean-Yves Le Drian, who is running for the presidency of the Regional Council in Brittany. Will he keep his current position? Only time will tell. Though Le Drian can definitely rely on the support of François Hollande, political setbacks remain a liability. Indeed, as indicated in other articles, Mr. Le Drian’s popularity within the Navy and the naval industry is quite remarkable.
This sector is spread across the country and business depends on public contracts. Suffice it to say, the employment stakes are high. Throughout the issue, readers will also come to realise that, despite the struggles it may be facing, the French Navy has been able to bounce back and carry on in spite of severe budgetary cuts. This is yet another achievement in these times of financial hardship and a sign of independence on a financial, technological and political level. Some of its European counterparts, such as the British Navy, have not been quite so lucky.

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offshore_une« Times are hard. » This is what we keep hearing from the players of the offshore industry. The sector is currently sailing in troubled waters, primarily due to the continuous drop in oil prices, which started a year ago. Though this might be a godsend for consumers, it is bad news for the sector, which has had to postpone and even cancel some investments. Seismic exploration, in which France has a major player, CGG, is one of the areas that has been hit by the crisis. Ultimately, due to the oil prices – as well as the geopolitical climate in Iran and Brazil – the offshore sector is having to have an extreme makeover.
This special issue will give readers all the details about the alliances, mergers and subsidiary creations that are rebuilding the sector where billions of dollars are at stake. All this comes with one imperative: to reduce costs, at any cost. But it is not all doom and gloom in the offshore industry. The favourable situation of Total and Engie, the major French energy corporations, or the relative optimism of shipyards operating for the offshore industry, can testify to this. The industry knows that until there is a drastic change of energy mixes, the demand for oil and gas supplies still needs to be met.

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une_yachts_largeAs yet, there is still no heir to the Azzam throne. At a grand total of 590 ft in length, this yacht, built by German shipyard Lürssen, remains the largest in the world. But this is not to say that 2015 has not had its share of news stories, especially in France, where the start of the year saw the delivery of the Yersin. This exploration vessel is as elegant as it is original and has reported remarkable performances.
It marks a bold first foray of Breton shipyard Piriou into the world of yachting, and this special issue contains interviews with the men who took part in the adventure. The launch was also indicative of a globally satisfactory year for French shipyards, who are establishing their reputations in maintenance, refit, and extensions, particularly on the Mediterranean coast. On an international scale, yacht construction is still overwhelmingly dominated by the three giants Italy, Germany and the Netherlands. In these pages you will discover a world on a seemingly never-ending path to excess, where innovation, luxury and sophistication call for ever increasing superlatives.

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CouvFR_nouveauxnavires.inddIn this special issue, le marin explores in detail the brand new ships and cutting edge equipment recently invented and designed in France and overseas. Shipyards and architects are pursuing their quest for energy saving measures by inventing innovative hull units and propulsion methods, and this in the passenger transport sector as much as in the fishing, renewable marine energy, offshore oil and gas sectors, as well as for ships responsible for State action at sea, etc. Chapters developed in this special issue.
Le marin also covers innovations in reducing harmful emissions, as well as ship layout and equipment. These advances are designed to make the ships more comfortable and safe for the crew and people on board.

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Couv HS Militaire OK.inddHow can naval power be increased in a time of budget restrictions? This is the conundrum that most national navies are currently facing. In this Naval Ships special issue, le marin explores all the solutions found by the great world powers, who are all affected differently by geopolitical tensions.
Le marin also gives the floor to experts, officials and analysts, who explain the French Navy’s strategic orientations in detail and reveal their vision of the future. The French industry, especially DCNS, is seeing different situations unfold on each site. This special issue also contains an economic assessment of each of the main players.

Read it here.